2016 State of Millennial Hiring Report is Out!

Over the past four years Looksharp has put out data as it relates to millennials and college hiring. Since its inception, over 100,000 millennials have respond to help us answer questions like: What are the best tools for finding internships and entry-level jobs? What social media platforms are millennials using to find jobs? What cities/industries do students want to work in? How long does it take for the average student to find full-time employment after graduation?

We’re thrilled to release the 2016 State of Millennial Hiring Report. With over 21,000 students responding to this year’s report the information provided will help recruiters understand the importance of employer brand, social recruiting, and expectations of students looking for internships and their first job out of college.

The report shares insights about millennial hiring by industry, geographic location, and business size. Key takeaways from the report include:

  • Internships are a critical element in determining career success. There are strong correlations between having at least one internship and improved job prospects after graduation and finding employment in the field of study.
  • But expectations after graduation may be unrealistic. There’s a $9,000 gap between college seniors’ salary expectations and actual starting salaries.
  • Demand for internships is higher than supply. Among the 31.5 percent who said they had not completed an internship to date, more than 70 percent said they had searched unsuccessfully.
  • More interns reported being paid for their work. The 2016 study found that 55 percent of internships were paid, up from 52.5 percent in 2015. The chances of receiving compensation vary significantly by major, industry and region.
  • Startups have seen their appeal grow. While midsize companies (50-500 workers) are still the most popular, preference for internships at startups jumped from 4.9 percent in 2014 to 7.4 percent in 2015 to 9.7 percent in 2016.

Download the full report.

Join us for the 2016 State of Millennial Hiring Webinar

Don’t have enough time to read all 39 pages of the report? Join us on Wednesday, May 10th for our 2016 State of Millennial Hiring Webinar. The webinar will last an hour and cover all the major trends that come from the report, plus a special discount to our 2016 URecruit Conference in Austin, TX. Register for the webinar

Join our 2016 State of Millennial Hiring Event Series!

This year Looksharp will be traveling around the U.S. putting on Lunch & Learns that cover the 2016 State of Millennial Hiring Report. If you’re a university recruiter or in charge of hiring interns/entry-level hires we’d love to see you at one of our events! These events are completely free to attend.

  • San Francisco, CA (May 9th & 10th)  Sold out!
  • Salt Lake City, UT (May 25th)
  • Denver, CO (May 26th)
  • Miami, FL (June 1st)
  • Jacksonville, FL (June 2nd)
  • Atlanta, GA (June 3rd)
  • New York City, NY (August 4th)
  • Richmond, VA (August 5th)
  • San Antonio, TX (August 10th)
  • St. Louis, MO (August 11th)

If you’re interested and located in a city we’re attending (list below) email me at blake(at)looksharp(dot)com and we’ll get you on the list!

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Blake McCammon

Blake is the Growth Marketing Manager at Looksharp. Before Looksharp, Blake spent over five years working with companies in the HR Technology space to help build influence and market their products to practitioners. He also helped build one of the largest HR & Social Media blogs on the Internet, Blogging4Jobs. In his spare time he enjoys tennis, skiing, traveling, and running a non-profit he co-founded, ProtoHack.

  • http://iandboreham.com Ian Boreham

    Great summary. Still seems that a large portion of interns are not getting paid. Fully appreciate the valuable experience they are picking up and the situation may be different for start ups, but established companies should be paying something. As for the salary expectations gap, I imagine high performing employees could bridge this gap in their second year and it raises an interesting point for employers who are essentially starting out not meeting employees expectations.