Tips to Evaluating Students During an Interview

You’ve had successful campus visits, screened resumes using an older blog post and are now ready to interview students. Here are the 5 best ways to evaluate students during an interview:

Arrival: How was their arrival? Did they show up just on time? Late? 30 minutes early? When they walked in, were they calm and collected, or frazzled? Were they nice to the receptionist and knew who they were asking for?

First impression: If the student was waiting in a conference room for you, did they get up when you walked in to shake your hand? Was it a firm handshake? Did they make eye-contact when meeting you? Evaluate the eye-contact throughout the interview – when you ask a question, do they look you in the eye to answer, or need to look around to collect their thoughts?

Interviewer Questions: If possible, assign a different skill to uncover to each interviewer. Not necessarily scripted questions (that can take away from the student and interviewer “connecting”) but if one interviewer is evaluating technical ability, and another is evaluating cultural fit, they will help your team create a full assessment.

Candidate Questions: Did the student come in with questions prepared? Were they based on his/ her research of the company? If they knew the interviewers, did they do research on those interviews (our biggest pet peeve – asking an interviewer how long they’ve been with the company – it’s on LinkedIn!). Not only did they have questions prepared, but were they able to formulate questions “on the fly” based on your conversation and what you shared about the job?

Enthusiasm: Does the candidate want the job? Did they seem engaged during the interview? When you asked them why they want the job, how compelling was their answer? Where else are they interviewing, and how does this position compare? Why is it their 1st choice over the others?

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Felicia Fleitman

Over 10 years of recruiting experience working in a variety of industries, including law, CPG and IT. Felicia spent several years focused on summer associate program strategy and execution for Big Law, before moving to agencies where she worked closely with company founders to help them identity and hire strategic leaders for their teams.

  • http://iandboreham.com Ian Boreham

    I think the focussing on one skill / strength each is a great idea and could potentially lead to a better experience for the candidate. With competition for top jobs so high I think it’s important to establish that rapport and put them at ease. Enthusiasm is such a good point and can tell a lot about how they will be on day 1.